Jimmy And Judy

on September 15, 2006 by Tim Cogshell
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“Jimmy and Judy” are a couple of disaffected, lower-class young people who, after a number of run-ins with authorities from teachers to parents, decide to take to the road in search of a commune run by the mystical Uncle Rodney (William Sadler). The hook is Jimmy's (Edward Furlong) penchant for videotaping everything they do -- everything. -- including a good bit of running around naked and a few not necessarily intentional murders. All for love and freedom.

None of these notions are particularly original: “Natural Born Killers,” “Kailfornia” and “Thelma and Louise” are just a few American films that cover this territory thematically if not literally. There's even the same video element in “NBK.” Here, the video is something of a contrivance on the part of filmmakers Randall Rubin and Jon Schroder. In addition to the fact that they never stop for tape stock and the batteries are always fully charged, one wonders why the internal video camera is any more revealing than the external. The notion developed within the storyline is simply that Jimmy wants to document his life, which is fine but offers the audience nothing it wouldn't glean by just watching the movie itself.

Performance-wise Furlong and Rachael Bella (“The Ring”) are energetic and engaging. They nail their youthful white-trash personas -- brighter than they look but wholly misdirected and probably a little pathological. The most prevalent problem with this youth-oriented road-kill movie is that it comes about a decade too late, or too soon, depending on one's point-of-view. Starring Edward Furlong, Rachael Bella, William Sadler and James Eckhouse. Directed and written by Randall Rubin and Jon Schroder. Produced by Randall Rubin, Ed Sanders, Gregory Scanlan and Jon Schroder. An Outsider release. Drama. Rated R for strong sexuality, nudity, violence, drug content and language. Running time: 99 min.

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