Tamara

on February 03, 2006 by Christine James
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By now, we all know what you did last summer and have had our ticket punched at our final destination. And nerdy girls have been turning hot and wreaking revenge on their nemeses at least since ZZ Top's heyday. Perhaps the Seventh Art didn't need a low- budget retread of '90s horror and '80s music video clich├ęs, but teenagers who can't get enough of peekaboo bras, short skirts and gory, pseudo-ironic comeuppances might sneak into this film after brining themselves in "Saw II" or "Hostel" for the tenth time.

"Tamara" is about a girl who I'm pretty sure has her name mispronounced throughout the whole movie. While that's indignity enough, she's further picked on because she has unstyled hair, wears glasses and has been dressed in a denim sack by the unsubtle costumer (who follows that up by garbing a drunken dad in what can only be described as a drunken dad shirt). When a prank on Tamara goes awry and she's accidentally killed, the callous cool kids bury her in the woods and agree to keep quiet about the incident. They're all shocked -- or at least that's the logical emotion audiences might project onto the tabula rasa acting -- when the dead-and-buried Tamara turns up alive, kicking, tarted-up and flashing a Fairuza-Balk- from-"The Craft"-style wicked grin. Soon, Tamara is channeling dark forces to dispatch her enemies, but no magic can glamour over the fact that scripter Jeffrey Reddick is trying to resurrect his "Final Destination" concept, only to dig up a desiccated corpse that should have stayed buried. Or at least Frankensteined together with some fresher meat. Starring Jenna Dewan, Matthew Marsden and Katie Stuart. Directed by Jeremy Haft. Written by Jeffrey Reddick. Produced by Danny Fisher, Chris Sievernich, Matt Milich and Martin Wiley. A City Lights release. Horror. Rated R for sequences of strong bloody violence, language, sexuality and teen drinking. Running time: 96 min

Tags: tarring Jenna Dewan, Matthew Marsden and Katie Stuart. Directed by Jeremy Haft. Written by Jeffrey Reddick. Produced by Danny Fisher, Chris Sievernich, Matt Milich, Martin Wiley, City Lights, Horror
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